Just Say No

No headed business man with NO thought bubble.

Image courtesy of Pakorn / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

When we talked about individual differences in my OB class this semester, I tried to stress the importance of self-awareness to the self-management process, which in turn leads to better people management skills. Visiting the Harvard Business Review website, I noticed the article “Nine Practices to Help You Say No” which I thought would benefit the students in their self-management practice. I also have a tendency to avoid saying no, so this article seemed like something I might benefit from, too.

Most of the tips are familiar. Until today, I’d always thought of myself as someone who says yes because I like to “be nice.” I’d never thought before how much of my over-commitment stems from not wanting to miss out. Being harried, of course, creates its own type of missing out in the form of burnout and distraction, but at the moment the request is conveyed, it’s hard to say no to all the possibilities that can arise from the opportunity.
Advertisements

Quotation of the Day

‎”[A liberal arts education] should be purposefully focused on teaching students a habit of mind to integrate ideas, to understand problems from multiple perspectives, and to challenge conclusions that may be too deeply rooted in only one perspective.” 

 

~Robert Zimmer, University of Chicago President

My Month Has Been Made

One of my students from Organizational Behavior and Management dropped by my office this afternoon. He told me that during his summer job, the concepts we talked about in class really became real to him, and he reflected on the class more than any other he’d had before. With great frankness, he mentioned he was the kind of student who crammed at the last minute and then often forgot about the content, so he was even surprised he retained so much from the course.

What a nice way to begin the semester!