Get Your Knit On

I think I will, thank you!Knit On (Wool and the Gang)

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Knit a Brick Update

After the Supreme Court decision in Burwell v. Hobby Lobby, the Secular Coalition for America called on knitters and crocheters to craft “bricks” to be joined together to make a wall to support the separation of church and state. Surpassing their original goal, they received over 1,500 bricks and will be marching the “wall” to the Supreme Court on September 9, 2014.

I knitted four bricks for the wall:
knit a brick squaresBricks arrived from all over the country!

Knit a Brick

Photo courtesy the Secular Coalition for America

This was a picture taken even before all the bricks were received:

Knit a brick

Photo courtesy of the Secular Coalition for America

 

Craftsy: Foundations in Double Knitting with Lucy Neatby

Earlier this year, I was knitting many washcloths for a charity, and as I looked for patterns, I came across the Inflammable Hotpad which looked fun to make. A problem: I’ve never used the double knitting technique before. This technique allows you to knit the front and back of a piece at the same time. If you use one color yarn, you’ll end up with a tube. Using two colors opens up a range of patterns where motifs pop due to contrasting colors.

Cell Phone Cozy Knit by Aimee Dars Ellis (design by Lucy Neatby)
Cell Phone Cozy
Pattern by Lucy Neatby

Since I wasn’t confident trying a project with the free instructions and videos I found online, I signed up with Craftsy to take Foundations of Double Knitting with Lucy Neatby. She provided clear instructions and helpful explanations, and after watching a few lessons, I knit one of the patterns that came with the course: the cell phone cozy. Having had such great preparation, I found completing this project was fun and easy. I still need to finish some of the lessons, though, and I haven’t worked on the other projects because they just aren’t to my taste.

When I purchased my Craftsy course, the site was running a sale, so I also enrolled in Adventures in Double Knitting. I am excited about this since Alasdair Post-Quinn seems to use many innovative techniques with interesting designs. I love cowls created with the double knitting technique, but I am hesitant to tackle double knitting in the round.

Craftsy classes don’t expire, so in several months, if I need a refresher, I can return to the courses to review a technique. The classes I’ve previewed have had excellent production values with valuable material presented in an organized and intuitive sequence. Many of the topics are not usually covered by classes offered at local knitting stores, and they are ideal for people who are visual learners.

If you are a knitter or crocheter on Ravelry, you can join the Craftsy group to share projects and reviews of classes.

Disclosure of Material Connection: Some of the links in the post above are “affiliate links” which means if you clickthrough and purchase the item, I’ll receive an affiliate commission. Rest assured, I only recommend products or services I use personally and believe will add value to my readers, and I purchased classes on Craftsy before becoming an affiliate. Any commissions go towards running the blog.  I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

Ravellenic Games: Part II

I knit two cat beds for the Tompkins County SPCA. The sides are floppy, but the beds themselves are cushy, so I hope some of the cats will enjoy them. For this, I received three medals – one in Free Dance (an open event), one in Charity Curling, and one in Stash Skeleton (for using yarn that has been in my stash for awhile).

 

Ravellenic Games: Alpine Abode Enhancement

Every two years during the Olympic Games, Ravelry hosts a knitting challenge called the Ravellenics. I wanted to get as many badges as possible during the games. One of my “medals” came from the Alpine Abode Enhancement category (including washcloths, pillows, blankets, and ornaments or any other home decor) for which I made a hearts garland using the Heart Bunting pattern from Knit 1, Purl 1. Finished in time for Valentine’s Day, I made 11 hearts in total, for the 10+ years George and I have been together.

Stay tuned for updates about my other Ravellenic Games accomplishments!

Ready for the Ravellenic Games

ravellenic games staging area

During the Olympics, as it has during the last two Olympic games, Ravelry is hosting a fun knitting event with categories like hat dash, toy toss, and wip wrestling. We can join teams and enter our project information into a virtual finish line, enabling participants to receive virtual medals of completion. I have taken over our living room coffee table for my staging area.

In previous years, the games have been called the “Ravelympics” but this year, the site received a cease-and-desist letter from the Olympic committee. The event was rechristened as the “Ravellenic Games” which is easier for me to say. (It’s all about me, you know.)

I haven’t read the text of the letter, but many have said it is rude and condescending. Business Week provided an interesting article on the controversy. I am trying to ignore that hiccup and get into the Ravellenic games. I’m meeting some other knitters at our local Panera Bread on Friday, so we can cast on during the opening ceremony. (With very specific exceptions, projects started before the opening ceremonies are ineligible for badges.)

These games, I plan on entering at least four events: toy toss, hat dash, wip wrestling (finishing a project that has languished since at least May 15), and single skein sprint (one skein projects), and maybe a neck or accessory event.